Tying the PERDIGONE- by Keith Falconer


Tying the PERDIGONE- by Keith Falconer

Fly tying: River Nymphs. The perdigone / ‘pellet fly
finished fies header
In the world of fly tying there are constantly new patterns and ideas that are being tried and tested. One that has grown quite popular over the last few years is a nymph pattern called the Perdigone. The concept comes from the Spanish which when translated means “Pellet” as in a shotgun pellet.
The fly is a heavy weighted uv resin coated fly taking on the shape and colour of your choice. It is designed to drop through the water column as fast as possible, getting into the zone faster than what a conventionally dubbed fly would, making your drift that much more effective. The fly is all about profile and keeping as slim line as possible. The uv resin creates a strong coat over the material but more importantly it creates a surface that doesn’t restrict the ability of the fly to drop through the water. The fly is fished in your faster moving parts of the river where the need to get down into the zone. When fished on thin tippets one is minimising the negative effect of drag.
This style of fly can be tied on a Jig hook or conventional hook. The materials used to create the body may vary, from thread to flashabou to sparkle thread. It also allows you to get creative with colours. Triggers and hotspots can easily be added behind the bead or on the butt depending on what pattern you would like to tie.
In South Africa the trend of perdigones has slowly crept in. With our yellowfish species relying on heavily weighted flies to get down into the zone this fly gets the same results yet you can use a smaller fly and nymph your runs properly instead of close ‘czech’ style of nymphing. Same applies to the trout… you can send a much smaller less invasive pattern into a run with the fly getting to the desired depth faster that what you would normally be able to.
The weighting game has always been a tricky one, but by remembering a few things it can be easily be beaten. The thinner your fly the faster it will drop through the water column (provided it has a tungsten head) You can add lead but be very wary of bulking your fly up and creating too much of a thick profile..
Below is the Step by step process.
ingredients
Materials used: Thread: UTC 70 fl fire orange. Tail: coq de leon. Body: UTC holographic tinsel. Ribbing: xsml silver. Uv resin: Loons uv fly finish flow. Wingcase: Loons Hard head Black.
Step 1: Tie in the tailing fibers. Coq de leon is preferable as you can use any hackle fibers. Remember to keep it sparse as less is more, some like to stick to 3 fibers but I don’t think the fish are that fussy. Just don’t have too much.
step 1
Step 2: Tie in your trigger, add ribbing and holo flash thenbring the thread behind the bead, Remember to keep the body as thin as possible and not bulk the fly up with too many thread turns.
step 2
Step 3: Wrap the holoflash up to the bead keeping a thin body.
step 3
Step 4: Wrap the wire ribbing with evenly spaced turns. Then create a hot spot behind the bead. Using a bodkin, apply the UV flow, covering the entire nymph body with a thin coat. Cure with UV light.
step 4
Step 5: Using a bodkin, create a wingcase with Loons hard head black. Once dry you can seal off the wingcase with a bit on uv resin just to give it a bit of strength against rocks etc. Fly finished
step 5
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Below are some more examples of different perdigones giving you an idea on how to get creative.
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Enjoy and good luck.
Keith Falconer